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Screen Machine | Issue 6. March 2014
From the editorBy Huw Walmsley-Evans
Special feature
In memory of Philip Seymour HoffmanBy Brad Nguyen, Anders Furze, Andrew Gilbert, Rebecca Harkins-Cross, Elizabeth J. Stigler, Huw Walmsley-Evans & Elliott Logan
Essays
Repetition as pejorativeBy Andrew Gilbert
Momentary repetition: approaching the cinematographBy Anders Furze
Reviews
Being Llewyn Davis“Inside Llewyn Davis” review by Melanie Ashe
A road through muddy paths“Hard to Be a God” review by Aaron Cutler

Screen Machine | Issue 6. March 2014

From the editor
By Huw Walmsley-Evans

Special feature

In memory of Philip Seymour Hoffman
By Brad Nguyen, Anders Furze, Andrew Gilbert, Rebecca Harkins-Cross, Elizabeth J. Stigler, Huw Walmsley-Evans & Elliott Logan

Essays

Repetition as pejorative
By Andrew Gilbert

Momentary repetition: approaching the cinematograph
By Anders Furze

Reviews

Being Llewyn Davis
“Inside Llewyn Davis” review by Melanie Ashe

A road through muddy paths
“Hard to Be a God” review by Aaron Cutler

Special new issue of Screen Machine on television. Online now.

Special new issue of Screen Machine on television. Online now.

ISSUE 4 OF SCREEN MACHINE IS NOW ONLINE!


From the editor — By Brad Nguyen

Special Article

The best films of 2012 — By Screen Machine contributors

Essays

Taking in Mike — By Huw Walmsley-Evans

Is The Hobbit even a film anymore? — By Robbie Fordyce

Reviews

Ang Lee’s “Life of Pi” — By Brad Nguyen

Kathryn Bigelow’s “Zero Dark Thirty” — By Elliott Logan

“Inside Nature’s Giants” — By Melanie Ashe

Quentin Tarantino’s “Django Unchained” — By Andrew Gilbert

Aaron Sorkin’s “The Newsroom” — By Whitney Monaghan

SCREEN MACHINE’S BEST FILMS OF 2012

11. The Extravagant Shadows
12. Barbara
13. Zero Dark Thirty
14. Headshot
15. Wuthering Heights
16. Back to Stay
17. Dark Horse
18. Himizu
19. Neighbouring Sounds
20. Marfa Girl

The whole list is available here.

SCREEN MACHINE’S 20 BEST FILMS OF 2012

  1. Holy Motors
  2. Moonrise Kingdom
  3. In Another Country
  4. The Master
  5. Tabu
  6. I Wish
  7. The Queen of Versailles
  8. Cosmopolis
  9. Prometheus
  10. No

The whole list is available here.

"The question is: What is the function of the horror element in relation to this element of ordinariness? In Buffy, the horror functions fairly conventionally: the ghoul is a metaphor for something that threatens to upset the ordinary course of things (the overbearing mother who lives vicariously through her daughter, the teacher who seduces students, Internet predators, school bullying). It is Buffy’s function to “slay” these threats to ordinary life and return Sunnydale to a state of equilibrium. In Twilight, the horror functions differently. Though Edward warns Bella that his vampire-passion might cause him to destroy her, she nevertheless pursues him. When she becomes pregnant to a half-vampire baby that threatens to crush her body from within, she stubbornly refuses an abortion despite the protests of her family. The horror is not an external threat to Bella’s existence; it is an inherent part of her romantic utopia … Love in practice and as it is to be defended is always marked by a minimum level of risk, the danger of losing one’s self. To the extent that the penultimate film in the Twilight series, Breaking Dawn – Part 1, is alive to this dark underside to love, it must be defended as a bold piece of popular art.”
— Brad Nguyen, “LOVE IN ALL ITS HORROR,” Screen Machine 3.
Read the whole essay here.
"This scene is totally narratively isolated from all the other scenes in the film, pays homage to concerns that are entirely external to the film, and engages in direct criticism of a number of cultural objects: star persona, pop music, masculine heterosexual objectification of women, and the drug-addled veterans of US military engagement … Yes, the narrative is bad, but it doesn’t matter. Kelly cuts to the core of character actors and generic styles in order to expose their radical potential for experimentation, and Southland Tales should be appreciated for this reason.”
— Robbie Fordyce, “TEXTUAL PROMISCUITY IS NOT A CRIME,” Screen Machine 3
Read the whole essay here.

“The task of the writers for this issue was to write on films they felt could not be categorised as “good films” but that, nonetheless, had a redeeming quality or feature. The goal was to write positively about these “bad films,” not for the purpose of celebrating trash, but to identify points of possible resistance, those discrete moments when our commodity culture is beautiful in spite of itself.”

—   “FROM THE EDITOR,” Screen Machine 3
THE LATEST ISSUE OF SCREEN MACHINE IS NOW ONLINE

THE LATEST ISSUE OF SCREEN MACHINE IS NOW ONLINE

Illustration by Badra Aji

Illustration by Badra Aji

(Source: screenmachine.tv)